Weekly Wrap-Up for February 6th, 2015

pulse of morning x familiar faces x observing energies

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Observing Energies

When: On view through February 21st, 2015

Where: 400 The Fenway, Boston, MA 02115

How: Official Website

What/Why: “Daniel’s paintings are biased, imperfect visual transmissions painted from life, of the friends, family, and acquaintances that are a part of his personal story. It is a way for him to connect to living; to connect to an inner narrative that stems from an understanding of one’s role and experience in the world. These works are a response to his experience of looking, which while very personal, can also invoke a universal recognition. For Daniel, working from observation is not an end but rather a beginning point for an emotional, formal, and imaginative statement of exploration. He believes in the responsive energy that comes from painting directly from the subject: the give and take between painter and subject, painter and painting.”

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George McNeil: About Place

When: On view through

Opening Reception: Friday February 6th, 5-8PM

Where: ACME Fine Art, 450 Harrison Avenue #308, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: “For ACME Fine Art’s first exhibition of the 2015 season Gallery Director David Cowan will present the gallery’s sixth solo show of oil paintings by 20th century expressionist master George McNeil. The exhibition will open at ACME Fine Art’s SoWa gallery on Friday, 9 January 2015. A reception will be held from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. on 6 February in conjunction with SoWa’s First Friday of February celebration. The exhibition will be comprised of a group of 18 landscape inspired paintings from the estate of the artist that date from between 1955 and 1990. The works range from small, highly abstract panels that were painted en-plein-air at the height of the Abstract Expressionist Movement, to monumental mixed media studio paintings that McNeil made from the beginning of the Figurative Expressionist Movement—mid-century through the late 20th century—as part of what later became known as the Neo-Expressionist Movement. The exhibition will be on view through Saturday, 21 February 2015. Exhibition catalogues will be available through the gallery.”

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Larry C. Volk: The 4 Questions

When: On view through March 1st, 2015

Opening Reception: Friday February 6th, 6-8:30PM

Where: Bromfield Gallery, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: The 4 Questions is a single-channel video work with accompanying prints, which uses the Passover Seder as a framework to explore the Holocaust experiences of Rosette Volk, the artist’s mother.

Larry Volk examines his family history through the ritual of the Seder meal, which embodies the Jewish tradition of recollection and remembrance.”

Also on view..

Jill Weber: New Paintings

What/Why: My work incorporates the essentials of architectural space and detail into compositions that are both ambiguous and concrete. In each painting I intentionally create a disorienting sense of depth and movement.

It has been said that I turn “our perceptions about space upside down by morphing the tangible, asking us to confront architectural space as repositories of memory and the endless possibilities of human interaction.”

I hope that is true.”

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Sheila Pepe – A Place for Looking

When: On view through February 14th, 2015

Where: Carroll and Sons, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

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ésxatic photo

When: On view through February 28th, 2015

Where: Samsøn Projects, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: “COREY ESCOTO, VIK MUNIZ, PAUL PFEIFFER, RICHARD PRINCE, STERLING RUBY, LUCIE STAHL & SARA VANDERBEEK”

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Anna Collette: Gathering Ground

When: On view through February 21st, 2015

Where: Gallery Kayafas, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: We are pleased to be showing Anna Collette’s Gathering Ground. A graduate of Massachusetts College of Art and Design and Yale University, Collette now lives in Texas where she is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Texas at Austin.

As with Collette’s earlier series, these images are placed in the natural environment. Regarding Gathering Ground, Collette says, I made this work in the southern most reaches of Travis County several months after a historic rainfall, which further worsened the seasonal flooding. The flood in Onion Creek uprooted trees­­–having shallow root systems–and rushed downstream. The trees were caught by a grove of Live Oaks–acting as a net–to create a 30-foot wall of water. I arrived a few months later. I first saw the creek, now dry and ashen, from the highway overpass. I began wandering up and down the bridge, placing my camera over the edge of the rail. With the monocular perspective of the camera, I saw a dizzying and almost revisionist view wherein the fallen seemed to stand. I then began trespassing. I photographed the accumulation of limbs and branches caught in the trees. I thought these images in the landscape related to the history of portraiture. Week after week, I returned with a large 12×15 foot studio backdrop and made singular portraits of the trees and debris, fixating on their hanging limbs and severed sticks.”

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As Above, So Below

When: On view through March 1st, 2015

Opening Reception: Friday February 6th, 5:30-7:30PM

Where: Kingston Gallery, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: “Kathleen Gerdon Archer’s work considers the accumulated effect of place, genetics and history on the individual and the family. This series is a momento mori for her family history and echoes Archer’s interest in the geological evidence shaping the coastal New England landscape. She collects stones, seeds, family photographs and personal ephemera from a particular location. These collected elements are arranged in receptacles and frozen, layer by layer, to build conglomerate structures. After removal from the containers, she photographs the icy constructions at intervals, as they disintegrate. It is a constant surprise that these layers of common elements, held together by such a fragile architecture, reveal such an intricate configuration of content. The final images, presented in large format here, are those which have the greatest personal meaning for the artist.”

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Brian Zink

When: On view through February 10th, 2015

Where: Miller Yezerski Gallery, 460 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

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Winter Group Show

When: On view through February 28th, 2015

Opening Reception: Friday February 6th, 6-8PM

Where: Chase Young Gallery, 450 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

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Terry Gips: Quantum Entanglement

When: On view through February 28th, 2015

Opening Reception: Friday February 6th, 5-8PM

Where: Galatea Fine Art, 460B Harrison Ave., #B-6

How: Official Website

What/Why: “I have been making art about tangled complexities; the process is like playing a game of chess between order and chaos, knowing and not knowing, remembering and forgetting. I sometimes use grids to structure the chaos, wildness and randomness found in nature. And I take notice of the parallels between these natural entanglements and those of the mind and the brain and hope that perhaps through these images I can catch a glimpse of the 500 trillion synapses, and the dendrites, axons, and nodes in my brain and nervous system.”

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Familiar Faces

When: On view through March 15th, 2015

Where: Adelson Gallery, 520 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: “I have been surrounded by Andrew Stevovich’s work my entire life. In the house I grew up in, my parents hung Sargent and Cassatt in the living room, and Stevovich in the kitchen, where our family spent most of their time. I have fond memories of relating to these quiet pictures while I was eating. I imagined that the Woman with a Fishbowl(1996) depicted a narrative of my pet, Goldie, and the menacing previous owner who seemed ready to torment my poor goldfish with her net. As a child, I saw simplicity in Andrew’s oils. I understood them to be more familiar than the cartoons I watched on Saturday mornings; yet, like the cartoons, the imagery represented daily life in a colorful and entertaining manner. Now, as an adult, I see the complexity of his soft, linen canvases. I see the intricacy of composition and technique, as well as the density of his subject matter. The underlying complexities of Stevovich’s process contrasts with the flatness of his characters. What at first seems simple about these paintings becomes elaborate when investigated thoroughly. Compositionally, the people and objects are very carefully designed. Often using the Fibonacci ratio (a mathematical formula derived from biological forms), the artist arranges curved and straight lines in a way that simultaneously balances the canvas and expands the image beyond the frame. Stylistically, his figures seem casually drawn — given their ethereal appearance; however, the artist painstakingly applies each line with deliberate precision. By shifting the angle of the parabola that separates the lips of a mouth or curve of an eye, Stevovich achieves a range of emotion with a very minimal approach. ” Continue reading here

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Space / Craft

When: On view through

Opening Reception: Friday February 6th, 5-8PM

Where: Boston Sculptors Gallery, 486 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: “Educator, architectural model maker, one-time farmhand and carpenter, Chris Abrams’ work draws on a broad range of skills and experience to examine his fascination with the forms and language of science fiction. Space/Craft fixes on small-scale sculptures, heavily influenced by sci-fi props, pop culture materiel and architectural models.”

Also on view..

Pulse of Morning

(prior work by the artist)

What/Why:Murray Dewart’s exhibition called Pulse of Morning features a wide array of inventive sculptures both large and small. He has used every available industrial tool for his lyrical and poetic purpose: brightly colored wall pieces in rolled and welded aluminum, stainless steel that is cut with water-jets, magisterial works in slab granite, lost-wax bronze and cast glass. The sculptor continues his quest for a universal language, borrowing from Celtic, Mayan and Tibetan traditions, while sharing much with New England transcendentalists of the past. He uses computer-aided technology for a poetic purpose that is nature-based. “When the granite is roughcut in the right way” he states, “you can still feel the mountain speak.” On the wall is a text from Emily Dickinson:”Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul.” There is a sea stone piece built with massive boulders. There are bird’s nests and sea creatures that signal a lyrical,psalm-like meditation on the natural world.”

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China Diaries

When: On view through March 22nd, 2015

Where: Laconia Gallery, 433 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02118

How: Official Website

What/Why: “There is vitality in those moments in which these eleven artists identify: viewing the contemporary art movements in China. This group of young artists, with the exception of one, are MFA candidates of the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, College of Visual and Performing Arts. They have infused their work with energy, and fresh zest as they saw life in that society, extracted from a profound experience in China during the summer of 2014. They were inspired to create new artistic vocabularies in their transition of “now”. They combine their new found wisdom as they grasp China’s old civilizations, combined with the energy of the new and the ‘emerging art forms’ that will transform the visual arts in ways that positively revalue ours, and their contributions to Contemporary Art in the United States.”

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I am convinced February can only get calmer. Enjoy your weekend! ♥

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